Killer Nashville’s Book of the Day / Sunday, May 13, 2012 / “The Solitary House” by Lynn Shepherd

Today’s featured book is The Solitary House by Lynn Shepherd.

"Solitary House" by Lynn Shepherd

“Solitary House” by Lynn Shepherd

Why I chose this book:

Well plotted like a spider web. The detective makes serious mistakes, which gives this a sense of realism. Ties in characters from Dicken’s “Bleak House.” (I’m a Dickens fanatic, without a doubt). By the way, Dickens once thought of titling his “Bleak House” as “The Solitary House” instead. I think it’s cool that Shepherd (who has a doctorate in the literature) picks up on that with this tie-in. This is the second Lynn Shepherd book. She combines classic literature with detective novels, both of which I love. If you like your detective fiction a little deeper in the well, she’s an author to read. I”m looking forward to her third book.

Lynn Shepherd’s first acclaimed novel of historical suspense, “Murder at Mansfield Park”, brilliantly reimagined the time of Jane Austen. Now, in this spellbinding new triumph, she introduces an unforgettable duo of detectives into the gaslit world of Dickens.

London, 1850. Charles Maddox had been an up-and-coming officer for the Metropolitan police until a charge of insubordination abruptly ended his career. Now he works alone, struggling to eke out a living by tracking down criminals. Whenever he needs it, he has the help of his great-uncle Maddox, a legendary “thief taker,” a detective as brilliant and intuitive as they come.

On Charles’s latest case, he’ll need all the assistance he can get.

To his shock, Charles has been approached by Edward Tulkinghorn, the shadowy and feared attorney, who offers him a handsome price to do some sleuthing for a client. Powerful financier Sir Julius Cremorne has been receiving threatening letters, and Tulkinghorn wants Charles to-discreetly-find and stop whoever is responsible.

But what starts as a simple, open-and-shut case swiftly escalates into something bigger and much darker. As he cascades toward a collision with an unspeakable truth, Charles can only be aided so far by Maddox. The old man shows signs of forgetfulness and anger, symptoms of an age-related ailment that has yet to be named.

Intricately plotted and intellectually ambitious, The Solitary House is an ingenious novel that does more than spin an enthralling tale: it plumbs the mysteries of the human mind.

“A highly compelling, immaculately written nineteenth-century murder mystery with a lot of Dickensian references in the language…an engaging read.” –The Independent

If you want to make your own comments on this selection, we would love to hear from you. Join our Facebook Killer Nashville group page and join in the discussion.

Remember that these books are listed at a discount through Amazon. You also don’t have to purchase the version that is featured here. Many of these books are available in multiple formats: e–book, hardcover, softcover, and audio. Enjoy!

– Clay Stafford, Founder of Killer Nashville

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About Clay Stafford

Clay Stafford is an author / filmmaker (www.ClayStafford.com) and founder of Killer Nashville (www.KillerNashville.com). As a writer himself, he has over 1.5 million copies of his own books in print in over 14 languages. Stafford’s latest projects are the feature documentary “One of the Miracles” (www.OneOfTheMiracles.com) and the music CD “XO” (www.JefferyDeaverXOMusic.com). A champion of writers, Publishers Weekly has identified Stafford as playing “an essential role in defining which books become bestsellers” throughout “the nation’s book culture.” (PW 6/10/13)
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